Louise Thompson shares picture of 'horrendous' rash | Daily Mail Online

2022-10-28 09:25:00 By : Mr. Alister Technology

By Charlotte Dean For Mailonline

Published: 10:53 BST, 4 October 2022 | Updated: 17:05 BST, 5 October 2022 Electric Procedure Chair

Louise Thompson has shared a picture of a rash on her face as she admitted she feels like her immune system is 'attacking her'.

The former Made In Chelsea star, 32, said the 'whole family have come down with something' and her little boy Leo, nine months, also has a perforated ear drum.

Sharing her woes with her followers, Louise admitted she feels like 'someone has poured battery acid in her head' as she struggles with a flu-like condition.

Ouch! Louise Thompson has shared pictures of a rash on her face as she admitted she feels like her immune system is 'attacking her'

Louise has been struggling with severe mental health problems and PTSD since the traumatic birth of her son Leo nine months ago but has also been battling a plethora of physical side effects from the birth. 

Louise said: 'I've woken up with the most horrendous rash and swelling accompanied by this ongoing headache and really bad pain in my face.

'I feel like my immune system is attacking my face. It's actually a miracle anyone got any sleep in our household last night. Ryan has come down with it too.'

Louise also revealed on her Stories that her 'poor little monkey' Leo needs antibiotics to treat his perforated ear drum.

Offering an update, she said: 'Little cub is eating again which is good. He's on antibiotics and has had quite a lot of sleep today. He doesn't want to eat his normal food but likes cold things from the fridge and watermelon.'

Poor little monkey! The former Made In Chelsea star, 32, said the 'whole family have come down with something' and her little boy Leo, nine months, also has a perforated ear drum

Further explaining her own situation, she said: 'Us on the other hand. I honestly feel like someone has poured battery acid into my head. I've been given co-codamol for the pain but now worried about that interacting with mirtzapine.

'Something I've taken over the past few days has turned my typical 'flu' into something much worse.

'I can handle temperatures, body aches and paints, but the unrelenting pressure around my temples is astronomical.'

Aw: Louise also revealed on her Stories that her 'poor little monkey' Leo needs antibiotics to treat his perforated ear drum

Last month, Louise revealed she has suspected Asherman's syndrome - a rare condition where scar tissue builds up inside the uterus - as she continues to seek answers on her mystery health condition.

Updating her followers on her condition, Louise revealed her cramping 'has started to get pretty bad' as she also slammed NHS wait times.

Sitting in the back of a car wearing her hood over her head with a fresh face of make-up, Louise candidly told her 1.4million followers about her latest prognosis.

Going into detail she explained: 'Off to my 10000000x medical appointment this year dressed as a worm.

'Going to go and have a scan of my pelvis. First one in about 3 months.'

Unimpressed with the health service, the frustrated patient wrote: 'The NHS are saying I'll have to wait months longer for a follow up appointment, so I'm going private... 

Pain: Last month, Louise revealed she has suspected Asherman's syndrome - a rare condition where scar tissue builds up inside the uterus - as she continues to seek answers on her mystery health condition

Proud mother: Updating her followers on her condition, Louise revealed her cramping 'has started to get pretty bad' as she also slammed NHS wait times

'Bit of a joke really when I still don't have any answers as to what's going on in that region and the last ultrasound was 'inconclusive' and the guy joked that it looked like there was something white and shiny in there.

'My cramping has started to get pretty bad and I still haven't had a menstrual cycle 10 months sooooo.'

As she waited to see her consultant, Louise once again took to her phone to post a further update.

Sharing a picture of her Nike trainers and her classic Chanel flap bag - she pondered: 'I don't know why I look to you guys for answers given that you don't know the full extent of what happened. 

Explanation: As she waited to see her consultant, Louise once again took to her phone to posting a further update

'I actually received an investigation report with details thicker than the complete works of Shakespeare the other day but I'm afraid to open it. 

'I was also scheduled to have a private hysteroscopy (small camera inside) in July but it coincided with my readmission to hospital for my ulcerative colitis, so it's been on the back burner. Sometimes I can't believe this is my life.'

After an emotional morning, the TV favourite went on to share a picture of private health care provider The Harley Street Clinic.

Full of relief after her trip to the world-leading private hospital, Louise told her followers how the appointment was a success. 

Answers: After an emotional morning, the TV favourite went on to share a picture of private health care provider The Harley Street Clinic

'Harley Street clinic is iconic,' she excitedly wrote. 

'Just had my appointment with the kindest and most trustworthy obs/gyne...it's likely that I have adhesions inside my uterus causing something called Asherman's Syndrome.   

'A hysteroscopy would offer a better look inside the cavity than an ultrasound but because I might need to start thinking immunosuppressants, having non essential surgery isn't really an option. 

She concluded: 'The main impacts of Asherman's are: painful cramping and fertility problems.'

If you have been affected by this story please contact Birth Trauma Association at birthtraumaassociation.org.uk

For help and support with perinatal mental illness please contact PANDAS on 0808 1961 776

Asherman's syndrome can affect the uterus of any woman who has conceived. There are no genetic or hereditary factors.

The uterus is lined by the endometrium which has two layers. The top layer is shed during menstruation, while the basal layer is needed to regenerate it. 

Trauma to this basal layer, usually after a D&C (dilation and curettage, performed to remove placental remains after an elective abortion, a missed or incomplete miscarriage or birth) can trigger the normal wound-healing process. The damaged areas can fuse together, leading to scars or adhesions.

The scarring, which may be mild to severe, is not a result of an aggressive D&C but rather the body's own reaction to the procedure. 

It may in turn mean that the endometrium fails to respond to pregnancy hormones and can lead to infertility or repeated miscarriages, as well as high-risk pregnancies. 

Sufferers may have amenorrhea (no menstruation) or pain on menstruation, indicating the cervix is blocked by adhesions.

In many cases, but not all, fertility can be restored by removing the adhesions.

Pregnancy-related D&Cs account for 90 per cent of Asherman's cases. A drug-based alternative to D&C is just as effective in 95 per cent of women. But the remaining five per cent will then need a D&C, increasing their risk of developing Asherman's syndrome.

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